Tag Archives: new students

Dear Out of State Students,

Sup! Or as people here like to say.. Hey, how are y’all doing?

So you’ve decided to leave your home state and become a Tar Heel, huh? Whether you’ve crossed an ocean, the whole country, or simply a state border, congratulations! You’ve made it here now, and you’re part of the 18% that aren’t North Carolinian!

While that number may seem smaller than a dook heart (we’re talkin’ very small), it’s more than it seems and more than enough to make you feel at home. If you’re not from the South, one thing you’ll quickly learn about it is its spirit of welcome, manners, and warmth. As you grow a new sense of home here, those features of the South are definitely your friends.

Before the fall, I hadn’t given going out of state any thought, hadn’t even considered the change of Southern culture. After all, I was coming from only two states away! No big deal, right? Well, gonna be honest here, not expecting things to be different resulted in culture shock hitting me like a biology textbook in the face.

Continue reading Dear Out of State Students,

RLPs at a Glance

Imagine living with a community of students who are all passionate about the same thing as you. Pretty cool, right? Residential Learning Programs (RLPs) offer all of the perks of living on-campus, with the added benefit of a unique educational experience right in the comfort of your own home. If you’re looking to become more involved at UNC, make friends who share your interests, or further explore your academic passions, an RLP may be for you! Read on for a brief description of each program—if one catches your eye, click the name for more details.

Chinese House

Located in Carmichael, Chinese House offers residents the chance to practice their Chinese speaking skills on a regular basis. Through conversational hours, service projects, and social activities, you’ll build your fluency while learning more about the Chinese culture. If you’re planning on majoring or minoring in Chinese or studying abroad in China, this RLP will provide a helpful immersion experience!

Members of the Sustainability RLP bond over a game of sand volleyball!
Members of the Sustainability RLP bond over a game of sand volleyball!

Transfer United

Also housed in Carmichael, Transfer United helps junior transfers make new friends and transition to life at Carolina. As a member of this RLP, you’ll have the opportunity to participate in mentorship programs, attend social events, and take on leadership roles within the transfer student community.

Pride Place

The newest RLP, Pride Place will be housed in Cobb and aims to provide a safe, inclusive, and welcoming community for LGBTQ+ residents. As a member, you’ll engage in conversations about diversity, self-identity, and healthy communication while building friendships with your neighbors.

Spanish House

Similar to Chinese House, Spanish House provides residents with frequent immersion opportunities. As a member of this RLP, you’ll live in Craige North and participate in cultural development activities, social programs, and service projects like tutoring or translating. If you’re taking a Spanish course or already have some experience with the language, Spanish House is the perfect to further explore your interest in the culture.

Balance volunteered at the Carolina Campus Community Garden as a service project.
Balance volunteered at the Carolina Campus Community Garden as a service project.

UNITAS

Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology and APPLES service-learning, UNITAS is located in Ehringhaus and centers around sociocultural diversity. Members of this RLP take two 3-hour courses—one per semester—with their fellow residents, as well as participate in a semester-long service-learning project. If you’re passionate about topics surrounding diversity in gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and sexual orientation, UNITAS may be for you!

Balance

Located in Joyner, Balance focuses on all eight dimensions of wellness, including physical, social, and emotional. As a member of this RLP, you’ll learn about each dimension through frequent educational and social events, from retreats to sports tournaments. Residents also commit to fostering an inclusive and healthy environment within the community.

Service & Leadership

If you’re passionate about public service and community service, this RLP provides plenty of opportunities to develop your leadership skills in these areas. Residents complete service hours, participate in a social change workshop, and take an APPLES service-learning course, all while living together in Hinton James.

WELL residents get ready to take a group field trip off campus!
WELL residents get ready to take a group field trip off campus!

WELL: Women Experiencing Learning and Leadership

WELL aims to provide residents with the chance to build friendships, leadership skills, and an appreciation of their gender expression and identity. While living in McIver, members of this RLP attend retreats and training sessions, complete a women’s studies course, and participate in community service activities.

Sustainability


It’s easy being green when you’re a member of this RLP—residents participate in seminars, social and educational events, and service projects centered around the environment and other systemic issues. Housed in Morrison, the Sustainability RLP offers plenty of opportunities for discussion and hands-on work within the community, including documentary screenings, park clean-ups, group dinners, and guest speakers.

Want to join an RLP? First-years, transfers, and returning students can all apply—the deadline for rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors is March 1, while new students are eligible once you’ve accepted admission. Just follow these instructions, and you’ll be on your way to living in one of these unique academic communities!

Tar Heel Transportation: Getting Around Campus

You leave your room in Hinton James, head to class in Carroll Hall, eat lunch at Lenoir, circle back to another class in Genome Sciences, work out at the SRC, return to Hinton James, then go to dinner with friends on Franklin…the daily life of a Carolina student involves plenty of rushing around campus. While UNC is pretty walkable, sometimes you need a quicker way to get around. Read on to learn about transportation on campus, plus a few tips on how to make walking more enjoyable!

All of the Chapel Hill transit buses are free for students.
All of the Chapel Hill transit buses are free for students.

Take the Bus

A, D, F, J, S, T…the long list of bus routes can seem like a confusing bowl of alphabet soup. Which one should you get on? Luckily, you’ll only need to know three routes to get anywhere on campus—you’ll be thankful you’ve mastered them when it’s 20 degrees outside or you have to get from Craige to the Hanes Art Center in 20 minutes.

• RU: The RU (Reverse Shuttle) runs counterclockwise, so you’ll usually ride it from South Campus to North. Hop on at the stop next to the sand volleyball courts by Hinton James or outside Ehringhaus and Koury, and you can get off by Fetzer Gym, the Union and Davis Library, or the Old Well.

• U: The U (Campus Shuttle) runs clockwise, but you may ride it toward North or South Campus depending on where you’re trying to go. Popular stops include Horton, the Dean Dome (close to the business school), the Hinton James sand volleyball courts, Student Stores, the ROTC building (across from the FedEx Global Center), Hanes Art Center, and Franklin Street.

• P2P: The P2P runs counterclockwise every night from 7pm to 4am, so you’ll never have to worry about making it back to your residence hall safely. The shuttle stops at Ehringhaus and Koury, Hinton James, and Public Safety (between Morrison/Hardin and Craige/Craige North), and takes you toward Franklin Street and Granville Towers.

You can check out a Tar Heel Bike for free at any of the South Campus high-rise residence halls!
You can check out a Tar Heel Bike for free at any of the South Campus high-rise residence halls!

Pro tip: download the NextBus or EZ Chapel Hill Transit apps. With these handy programs, you can bookmark your most-used bus stops and see how many minutes remain until the next bus arrives. Check out the bus and P2P routes online for the full list of stops!

Ride a Bike

Biking is another quick way to get around campus—plus, you’ll get some great exercise. (They don’t call it Chapel Hill for nothing!) If you bring a bike, you’ll want to purchase a sturdy U-lock and register it for free with the Department of Public Safety to protect against theft.

Don’t have your own wheels? The Residence Hall Association sponsors a program called Tar Heel Bikes, where you can check out a bike from the Hinton James, Craige, Ehringhaus, or Morrison community office for free with your OneCard!

Walking gives you the chance to spend time with friends and enjoy the beautiful sights on campus!
Walking gives you the chance to spend time with friends and enjoy the beautiful sights on campus!

Walk

Fall weather is coming! While the trek from South Campus can be miserable in the sweltering heat, crisp mornings and scenic autumn leaves are on the way. In the meantime, hiking around campus all day is an awesome workout, and you can make it more enjoyable by listening to music, setting a goal for the number of steps you take per day using an app or a Fitbit, or walking with friends.

Whether you decide to walk to and from North Campus every day, or you give up on that plan and start taking the bus after the first month (I may or may not speak from personal experience…), there are plenty of ways to get around campus. Don’t hesitate to try them all and figure out which works best for you!

Residence Hall How-To’s: Doing Laundry

You’ve been living in your residence hall for a week or two, and you notice your laundry hamper filling up quickly. Your mom is not around to conveniently wash, dry, fold, and deliver your clothes right to your room, and you only have a few more days before you’ll have to resort to wearing long-sleeved shirts and sweatpants in the middle of August. The time has come—you have to do your first load of laundry. Whether you’ve never done your own laundry before or you’re just unfamiliar with the on-campus machines, save yourself a call home from the laundry room with this how-to guide.

laundry

Washing Your Clothes

1. Load your clothes into the washer, taking note of the machine number.

2. Open the black plastic lid on top of the machine, and pour detergent and fabric softener into the labeled compartments.

3. Walk over to the electronic box on the wall and swipe your OneCard (one wash cycle costs $1). Push the machine number, and keep pressing Enter until you see your remaining balance.

4. Return to the machine, and select a fabric setting. I usually choose Bright Colors for my regular load of laundry and Delicates and Knits for nicer, more fragile shirts. Once you press a button, your wash cycle will begin!

Drying Your Clothes

1. Load your clothes into the dryer, taking note of the machine number, and add a dryer sheet.

2. Swipe your OneCard at the electronic box on the wall (one dry cycle costs $0.50). Push the machine number, and choose how many extra dry cycles you want (one extra is recommended, for a total cost of $1). Keep pressing Enter until you see your remaining balance.

3. Return to the machine, and select a fabric setting. I pick Whites and Brights for my regular load of laundry, hanging my more delicate shirts to dry in my room. Once you press a button, your dry cycle will start!

Other Tips and Tricks

1. One wash cycle takes between 35 to 40 minutes to complete, while two dry cycles takes an hour. The laundry rooms can get busy, so take out your clothes on time—or somebody may take them out for you!

2. On the flip side, if you’ve been waiting by a completed washing machine for more than 10 minutes, it’s okay to take the clothes out. Some residents will just place them on top of the machine, but it’s nice to be polite and put them in a dryer.

3. Nothing’s worse than trekking down from the 10th floor of Hinton James only to find that all the laundry machines are full! The OneCard CaroLaundry website shows you which machines are available in each residence hall and allows you to set up email or text notifications when your laundry cycle is done.

Don’t let doing laundry for the first time intimidate you—once you know how the machines work, washing and drying your clothes is a piece of cake!

Weekends on Campus: What to Do?

The countdown to move-in has begun, and you’re busy shopping for supplies, texting your roommate, and signing up for classes. However, what happens after you’ve settled in? As a first-year student (or even a returning one), weekends are the prime time to explore, meet new people, and really make UNC feel like home. When Friday arrives, stick around and try one of these 5 activities right on campus!

Hundreds of residents attended the RHA Silent Disco.
Hundreds of residents attended the RHA Silent Disco.

1. See a movie at the Union: Going to the movie theater on a regular basis is expensive (even with that handy student discount) and nearly impossible without your own transportation. Luckily, you don’t need cash or a car to see a film with your friends! Almost every Friday and Saturday night, the Union shows movies in the auditorium, free with your OneCard. The best part? Most of the films are new releases that just left theaters—last semester, the selection included Mockingjay, Gone Girl, Big Hero 6, and Interstellar.

2. Attend a Residence Hall Association (RHA) program: RHA provides fun, unique events for on-campus residents, from laser tag to a Silent Disco. (Picture a dance where everybody is listening to music on headphones!) Your residence hall’s Community Government, as part of RHA, will also host occasional weekend programs like cookouts or carnivals. Don’t get stuck eating Easy Mac in your room on a Friday evening—follow RHA and your community on social media to stay informed on upcoming events. Most of them offer some kind of free food!

The student section at football games is usually packed!
The student section at football games is usually packed!

3. Cheer on the Tar Heels at a game: Whether you just wear a UNC T-shirt or paint yourself Carolina blue from head-to-toe, watching the Tar Heels play is always exciting. Most Saturdays in the fall semester are football game days, and in the spring semester, basketball. However, I’ve also seen volleyball, soccer, and field hockey—less popular sporting events are usually still packed with students and often give out free T-shirts! Sign up for the Carolina Fever email listserv to learn which teams are playing each week. Attending games earns you Fever points, which can win you prizes ranging from water bottles to coveted basketball tickets.

4. Check out Campus Rec: Work out, try a group fitness class like cycle or yoga, swim laps at the indoor pool, play pick-up basketball—Campus Rec has something for everyone. My first year, my roommate and I were bored one Sunday afternoon and decided to visit the racquetball courts. We ended up just hitting the ball around more than actually playing by the rules, but it was definitely a fun stress reliever.

Staying in with friends can sometimes be the most fun of all.
Staying in with friends can sometimes be the most fun of all.

5. Hang out in your residence hall: When you’ve had a long week or the weather is bad, your own residence hall offers plenty to do—you can check out cookware, board games, DVDs, and more from the community office. Sometimes, the best memories are made by rounding up a group of friends and spending the evening inside baking cupcakes, laughing over Cards Against Humanity, or having a ping-pong tournament. In fact, one of my favorite moments this year was playing Just Dance on the game room Xbox with my friends on a snowy night.

When Friday comes around, you may be tempted to head home, but staying on campus those first few weekends is vital to making friends and becoming a part of the Carolina community. So, stick around and try one of these fun activities. You’ll soon look forward to spending weekends at UNC—there’s always something to do!

Meet the Interns: Katelyn Merendino

 IMG_1117

Katelyn Merendino

Position: Marketing Intern

Class: Junior

Major: Business Administration

Where I’ve lived on campus: Koury, Cobb

Favorite thing about residence life: It sounds cheesy, but you really do feel like a part of the Carolina community. Being surrounded by friendly people, fun activities, and school spirit every day is awesome. When else are you going to live within walking distance of all your best friends?

My advice for new students: Get involved—but after you explore, choose just 2 or 3 organizations to stick with. It’s easy to get carried away and sign up for 10 different clubs, but committing to the few you really care about is much more enjoyable! You’ll build meaningful relationships on campus and have a better chance of eventually taking on a leadership position.

 

To Bring or Not To Bring

The aisles of Target are stacked high with plastic storage bins and laundry baskets. Your mom drags you to Bed Bath & Beyond for the third time with a checklist longer than the walk from Hinton James to Franklin Street. Yep…college shopping season has arrived.

Getting everything you need before move-in day can be overwhelming. You have the basics (twin XL sheets, microfridge, alarm clock), but some things you don’t realize you need until you arrive on campus. When you’re loading up your parents’ minivan, make sure you have these 10 often overlooked items!

1. Umbrella: Chapel Hill, North Carolina—where the weather can switch from 10% chance of rain to 100% chance of thunderstorms in the time it takes you to walk to the bus stop right outside your residence hall (I speak from personal experience). Sitting in a cramped lecture hall soaking wet is no fun, so keep a small, portable umbrella in your backpack.

2. Lysol wipes: When one person on your floor gets sick, EVERYONE on your floor gets sick. Fight the inevitable campus-wide cold by wiping your doorknobs, desk, and other germ-ridden surfaces with Lysol wipes. You’ll also need them if you’re living in a residence hall where you have to clean your own bathroom (Koury, Horton, Craige North, and Hardin).

Professional Clothes

3. Professional clothes: Athletic shorts and T-shirts may as well be the UNC student uniform, but you’ll have to get dressed up more often than you’d think. Pack a business suit and a few business casual outfits for career fairs, on-campus job interviews, student organization meetings, etc.

4. Shower shoes: When you’re sharing a bathroom with 7 (or more) other people, you’re going to want something between your feet and the floor. Stop by Old Navy and pick up a few pairs of $2 flip-flops!

5. School supplies: College is still school, after all! Unlike in high school, though, your professors won’t care what you use to stay organized. I keep it simple with an accordion file for papers, a five-subject notebook (one section for each class), pens, and pencils.

Dinnerware

6. Dinnerware: Bring a plate, bowl, mug, spoon, and fork for those days when you’re not feeling Rams Head for dinner or you want to heat up some leftovers. Also, most residence hall programs are “bring your own bowl/mug/etc.”, so don’t get stuck using a paper towel as a plate for your pancakes!

7. Desk fan: I can’t sleep without my desk fan—the white noise drowns out loud floormates and slamming doors, or conversely, keeps the room from being too quiet. Not to mention, you’ll want a way to cool off after walking back from class in the 90-degree late summer heat.

8. Reusable water bottle: Don’t forget to stay hydrated! I fill up my water bottle every morning at Top of Lenoir, and most residence halls (and the Union) have water fountains with bottle attachments.

Surge Protector

9. Small duffel bag: Club sports, student organizations, church groups, and other things you may decide to join sometimes travel. Whether you’re going on an overnight trip or just heading home for the weekend, you’ll need something to pack your stuff in.

10. Power strip/surge protector: The number of wall outlets is limited, especially when you’re sharing the space with a roommate. I use a power strip (with a flat plug so it fits behind my desk) to plug in my phone, laptop, lamp, desk fan, and other electronic devices.

As you’re checking items off that mile-long college list, make sure to pick up these lesser-known essentials—you’ll be glad you have them once you move into your residence hall. Happy shopping!

The View from: Craige

Welcome to the Reslife blog, summer 2015 edition. If you’re an incoming first-year, you’ve recently received your housing assignment for the 2015-16 school year. While there is ample information about the residence halls on the official housing website, it doesn’t provide context and personality to the place you’ll be calling home next year! This series of posts will give a closer look, from a former resident’s perspective – there’s much more than meets the eye in every residence hall.

Craige - a six story residence hall which is the only building in the Craige Community.
Craige – a six story residence hall which is the only building in the Craige Community.

The first residence hall is Craige – where I lived my first year.

Continue reading The View from: Craige

Change Your Room with ‘Room Swap’

Starting July 1, Room Swap opens for first-year students

In May, UNC Housing announced the release of a new feature in the Housing Selection Process – Room Swap! With Room Swap, students can easily search for open spaces in every residence hall and apartment community available to them and make changes to their housing assignment on their own. And now, this feature will also be available to first-year students from July 1 – August 1!

So what does this mean and how do I swap?

This means that if you weren’t 100% happy with your assigned location, or you find someone different who you want to room with, you can go in and make the changes yourself. Swapping rooms is limited by room availability, of course, but now you have the ability to view what is available on your own.

Room Swap is located in Step #9 of your housing application, located at myhousing.unc.edu. Once you’re in the correct step, the Room Swap link should be located on the far right of the page.

Now that you’re in Room Swap, you’ll see the list of buildings available to you. Try clicking into each building, as some will have open rooms and other will not. Once you find the building you want, with rooms available in it, it’s time to pick the right room for you!

Building Selection on Room Swap
Building Selection

Continue reading Change Your Room with ‘Room Swap’