All posts by Giselle Pagunuran

Where to Nap on Campus

It’s that time in the semester. All the exams and deadlines start to blur together. The library becomes your second home.  And all you want is one real good nap.

Sometimes, you just need to take a quick break and recharge the ol’ noggin. Let me tell you about some of the spots you can catch a quick snooze.

The Bottom Floor of the Undergraduate Library

The super long curvy couch on the bottom floor of the UL is a solid nap spot. There’s enough room to bring along some friends and rock a group nap! The only thing is that it’s right at the entrance of that room, so you’re kind of being ~presented~ to everyone walking in. I’m insecure about my sleeping face but if you’re a normal person, it’s probably fine.

The Beanbags in the Aquarium Lounge, Student Union

These aren’t the most comfortable for napping in, but they’ll do. They’re like long beanbags, which you’d think would be great for sleeping. But I tried to lie down in one of those and I was a little disappointed. It’s structured like a chair, so it’s better for a relaxed sit rather than a full-on sleep. I mean, who designed those things? What did they think I would do in it? Sit and do work? It’s an okay place for desperate shut-eye, but it’s not the best. 2/5 stars.

Class of 2000 Lounge, Student Union

Okay, I’m honestly kind of conflicted about including this because it’s such a primo location. So please keep this between us. It’s usually pretty empty, and there’s a bunch of long chairs ready to cradle your tired body. Plus, it’s typically pretty quiet in there. It’s basically a sanctuary, 10/10. Please don’t all rush in there at once.

The Quad

It’s warm out. The sun is shining. You decide to lie down on the grass. You open your laptop fully intending to work on that paper you’ve been putting off. Then all of a sudden, that *sweet* breeze hits and you fall asleep on your keyboard. Of course, this only works during the warmer seasons. As long as you don’t mind the possibility of getting hit with a frisbee, the quad is a solid nap spot.

Meditation Room, Student Union

Apparently, in 2016, the Carolina Union changed the Meditation Room policy to allow for naps.  I’ve personally never been in there, but according to my friends who have, it’s great for a snooze. It’s quiet and peaceful, and I hear it’s not too crowded.

A Desk, Any Library

Sometimes you just need the quickest of power naps. Just scoot some of your stuff around and make a small space to rest your head. And make sure to set an alarm! You can take a quick rest, then get right back to work. Peak efficiency.

 

These are just a few of the cozy spots on campus. Let me know if I didn’t mention one of your favorite sleep spots! You can comment on this blog post, or let us know on social media.

Now get to napping!

 

 

The Suite Life: My Experience in a Shared Living Space

Living on campus is a key part of the authentic college experience. A lot of incoming first-years might be excited for the new adventure, but less excited about sharing a living space (and a bathroom).

As a weathered old first-year, I can tell you that I was in the same exact boat. But after a year of living in an eight-person suite, I realized there wasn’t much to worry about. Here’s what I learned:

ROOMMATES

Maybe you’re used to sharing a room with a sibling. Maybe you grew up with a room all to yourself. Whatever your past experience, living with a roommate is probably going to take a little getting used to.

Having a roommate is a little different than sharing a room with a sibling. For one thing, both of you probably won’t be related. Also, the room that you’re sharing isn’t just a bedroom – it’s where you live. That means everything you own and everything your roommate owns will be in the same space. So that means you need to be able to communicate what spaces and items are shared, and what you want to stay separate.

Another good thing about having a roommate is that you probably don’t have to buy all of the appliances and furniture you want to be in your dorm! I found it pretty convenient that I didn’t have to buy a microwave since my roommate already had one.

Something I was concerned about before moving in was having a different sleeping schedule than my roommate. Both of you probably won’t be going to sleep at the same exact minute of the same exact hour – how do you deal with that? Lamps, earplugs, sleep masks, and communication. Just let each other know if you’re going to sleep super early or super late. It only takes a few seconds to ask about things like turning off the lights and turning down any music and other things like that. If you’re a particularly light sleeper, earplugs and sleep masks would be a good investment. Also, you could talk to your potential roommate before even moving in and ask about what time they usually go to sleep.

Something else to keep in mind: Just because you live with this person doesn’t mean you have to be with them 24/7. If you tend to be introverted or you just like to have some time to yourself, the thought of living with another person might make you want to rethink the whole dorm thing. But as an awkward introvert myself, I think I have the authority to tell you that a roommate does not equal a life partner (Unless you want that, I guess. Up to you).

 

SUITEMATES

Suitemates are a step removed from roommates. You don’t share a room with them, but you do live in pretty close proximity to them.

Experiences with suite mates are pretty varied, as they are with roommates. I know people whose closest friends are their suitemates, and I know people who don’t even know their suitemates’ names. Personally, my suitemate group is pretty close with each other. While you can choose whether or not to talk to the other people in your suite, I would recommend hanging out with them whenever you can. I mean, it’s a built-in friend group – you don’t have to try too hard to get to know them.

BATHROOMS

Ah yes, the dreaded shared bathroom. Turns out, there’s not much to dread.

If you live in an eight-person suite, someone comes in and cleans the bathroom for you a few times every week. If you live in a four-person suite like in Koury, you’ll have to clean it yourself. I lived in HoJo, so the bathrooms were cleaned for us. If you live in a four-person suite, I would recommend organizing some kind of cleaning schedule with your suitemates so that the work is divided up fairly.

Sharing a bathroom with seven other people might sound scary, but surprise: it’s not. At least in my experience, and from what I’ve heard from other people, the bathroom situation isn’t as much of a hassle as I thought it would be. Everyone has different schedules, and everyone gets up at different times, so the bathroom is usually accessible whenever you need to use it. In all my time here, I never had to fight over who got to use the bathroom first, because the bathroom was always open.

Another thing: the bathroom does lock. If you’re coming out of the shower or just want some privacy, you don’t need to worry about someone bursting into the bathroom.

To wrap it up:

My experience living in a shared space wasn’t the nightmare I thought it would be. Visions of feuding roommates and duels over who got to take the next shower were replaced with new friends and sweet, sweet independence. Living on campus turned out to be the best way to start off my time at UNC.

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